src/share/classes/java/nio/charset/Charset.java

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rev 4099 : 7041612: Rename StandardCharset to StandardCharsets
Reviewed-by: alanb, mr, darcy


 198  *   byte-order marks. </p></li>
 199 
 200  *
 201  *   <li><p> When decoding, the <tt>UTF-16</tt> charset interprets the
 202  *   byte-order mark at the beginning of the input stream to indicate the
 203  *   byte-order of the stream but defaults to big-endian if there is no
 204  *   byte-order mark; when encoding, it uses big-endian byte order and writes
 205  *   a big-endian byte-order mark. </p></li>
 206  *
 207  * </ul>
 208  *
 209  * In any case, byte order marks occuring after the first element of an
 210  * input sequence are not omitted since the same code is used to represent
 211  * <small>ZERO-WIDTH NON-BREAKING SPACE</small>.
 212  *
 213  * <p> Every instance of the Java virtual machine has a default charset, which
 214  * may or may not be one of the standard charsets.  The default charset is
 215  * determined during virtual-machine startup and typically depends upon the
 216  * locale and charset being used by the underlying operating system. </p>
 217  *
 218  * <p>The {@link StandardCharset} class defines constants for each of the
 219  * standard charsets.
 220  *
 221  * <h4>Terminology</h4>
 222  *
 223  * <p> The name of this class is taken from the terms used in
 224  * <a href="http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2278.txt"><i>RFC&nbsp;2278</i></a>.
 225  * In that document a <i>charset</i> is defined as the combination of
 226  * one or more coded character sets and a character-encoding scheme.
 227  * (This definition is confusing; some other software systems define
 228  * <i>charset</i> as a synonym for <i>coded character set</i>.)
 229  *
 230  * <p> A <i>coded character set</i> is a mapping between a set of abstract
 231  * characters and a set of integers.  US-ASCII, ISO&nbsp;8859-1,
 232  * JIS&nbsp;X&nbsp;0201, and Unicode are examples of coded character sets.
 233  *
 234  * <p> Some standards have defined a <i>character set</i> to be simply a
 235  * set of abstract characters without an associated assigned numbering.
 236  * An alphabet is an example of such a character set.  However, the subtle
 237  * distinction between <i>character set</i> and <i>coded character set</i>
 238  * is rarely used in practice; the former has become a short form for the




 198  *   byte-order marks. </p></li>
 199 
 200  *
 201  *   <li><p> When decoding, the <tt>UTF-16</tt> charset interprets the
 202  *   byte-order mark at the beginning of the input stream to indicate the
 203  *   byte-order of the stream but defaults to big-endian if there is no
 204  *   byte-order mark; when encoding, it uses big-endian byte order and writes
 205  *   a big-endian byte-order mark. </p></li>
 206  *
 207  * </ul>
 208  *
 209  * In any case, byte order marks occuring after the first element of an
 210  * input sequence are not omitted since the same code is used to represent
 211  * <small>ZERO-WIDTH NON-BREAKING SPACE</small>.
 212  *
 213  * <p> Every instance of the Java virtual machine has a default charset, which
 214  * may or may not be one of the standard charsets.  The default charset is
 215  * determined during virtual-machine startup and typically depends upon the
 216  * locale and charset being used by the underlying operating system. </p>
 217  *
 218  * <p>The {@link StandardCharsets} class defines constants for each of the
 219  * standard charsets.
 220  *
 221  * <h4>Terminology</h4>
 222  *
 223  * <p> The name of this class is taken from the terms used in
 224  * <a href="http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2278.txt"><i>RFC&nbsp;2278</i></a>.
 225  * In that document a <i>charset</i> is defined as the combination of
 226  * one or more coded character sets and a character-encoding scheme.
 227  * (This definition is confusing; some other software systems define
 228  * <i>charset</i> as a synonym for <i>coded character set</i>.)
 229  *
 230  * <p> A <i>coded character set</i> is a mapping between a set of abstract
 231  * characters and a set of integers.  US-ASCII, ISO&nbsp;8859-1,
 232  * JIS&nbsp;X&nbsp;0201, and Unicode are examples of coded character sets.
 233  *
 234  * <p> Some standards have defined a <i>character set</i> to be simply a
 235  * set of abstract characters without an associated assigned numbering.
 236  * An alphabet is an example of such a character set.  However, the subtle
 237  * distinction between <i>character set</i> and <i>coded character set</i>
 238  * is rarely used in practice; the former has become a short form for the