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src/java.base/share/classes/java/time/temporal/JulianFields.java

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*** 1,7 **** /* ! * Copyright (c) 2012, 2013, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. * DO NOT ALTER OR REMOVE COPYRIGHT NOTICES OR THIS FILE HEADER. * * This code is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it * under the terms of the GNU General Public License version 2 only, as * published by the Free Software Foundation. Oracle designates this --- 1,7 ---- /* ! * Copyright (c) 2012, 2016, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. * DO NOT ALTER OR REMOVE COPYRIGHT NOTICES OR THIS FILE HEADER. * * This code is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it * under the terms of the GNU General Public License version 2 only, as * published by the Free Software Foundation. Oracle designates this
*** 115,125 **** * the Julian Day value is validated against the range of valid values. * In {@linkplain ResolverStyle#LENIENT lenient mode} no validation occurs. * * <h3>Astronomical and Scientific Notes</h3> * The standard astronomical definition uses a fraction to indicate the time-of-day, ! * thus 3.25 would represent the time 18:00, since days start at midday. * This implementation uses an integer and days starting at midnight. * The integer value for the Julian Day Number is the astronomical Julian Day value at midday * of the date in question. * This amounts to the astronomical Julian Day, rounded to an integer {@code JDN = floor(JD + 0.5)}. * --- 115,131 ---- * the Julian Day value is validated against the range of valid values. * In {@linkplain ResolverStyle#LENIENT lenient mode} no validation occurs. * * <h3>Astronomical and Scientific Notes</h3> * The standard astronomical definition uses a fraction to indicate the time-of-day, ! * where each day is counted from midday to midday. For example, ! * a fraction of 0 represents midday, a fraction of 0.25 ! * represents 18:00, a fraction of 0.5 represents midnight and a fraction ! * of 0.75 represents 06:00. ! * <p> ! * By contrast, this implementation has no fractional part, and counts ! * days from midnight to midnight. * This implementation uses an integer and days starting at midnight. * The integer value for the Julian Day Number is the astronomical Julian Day value at midday * of the date in question. * This amounts to the astronomical Julian Day, rounded to an integer {@code JDN = floor(JD + 0.5)}. *
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